Boulder International Chamber Music Competition presents duos from around the world

Live rounds and winners concert will be open to the public, Thursday–Sunday

By Peter Alexander Oct. 9 at 4:10 p.m.

Twenty classical music duos are arriving in Boulder this week from all over the world.

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Dairy Arts Center, location of the Boulder International Chamber Music Competition, “The Art of the Duo”

They are coming for the second Boulder International Chamber Music Competition, “The Art of the Duo,” which will unfold in the Gordon Gamm Theater of the Dairy Arts Center Thursday through Sunday, Oct. 11–14. The duos (listed here) include standard duo pairings, including violin and piano, cello and piano; other common pairings, including flute and piano, clarinet and piano, trumpet and piano; and one surprising pair, accordion and piano.

They are arriving from many parts of the globe. There are contestants from South Korea, China, Taiwan, Malaysia, France, Spain, Italy, Bulgaria and Poland, as well as the U.S. and Canada.

All live portions of the competition are open to the public, with semi-final rounds Thursday and Friday, Oct. 11-12, the final round on Saturday, Oct. 13, and the winners’ concert Saturday, Oct. 14 (see schedule below). All performances will be in the Gordon Gamm Theater. Tickets for the four-day event, or for each individual day of the competition, are available through the Dairy Web page.

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Mina Gajić

The competition is the brainchild of its artistic director, pianist Mina Gajić, who put together the first competition in 2016. Like many music contests, it will be held every two years.

“With each new iteration of the competition we’ll be able to continue promoting this kind of competition [for duos], which is pretty rare in the classical music world,” Gajić says. “At the same time we’re promoting Boulder as an arts destination and bringing even more visibility to our cultural life that is already rich.”

Gajić has assembled a jury of three accomplished musicians to judge the live rounds, representing three different instrument families represented in the competition:

  • lowres-jkp- Tara McMullen.125

    Jon Kimura Parker. Photo by Tara McMullen

    Pianist Jon Kimura Parker, an internationally recognized performer and director of the Honens International Piano Competition and Festival in Calgary;

  • Violinist Ani Kavafian, professor in the practice of violin at Yale University who has performed as soloist and chamber musician with leading ensembles around the world; and
  • Clarinetist Richie Hawley, who teaches at the Shepherd School of Music at Rice University and the Music Academy of the West in Santa Barbara, and appeared with the Boulder Bach Festival in Longmont in 2017.
Ani-Kavafian

Ani Kavafian

“Our judges are some of my favorite musicians,” Gajić says. “They are world-class performers and teachers, equally as soloists and chamber musicians.”

The application process for the competition began last summer. The deadline was in July, after which a four-person panel—Gajić, Zachary Carrettin of the Boulder Bach Festival, plus the 2016 winning duo of cellist Julian Schwarz and pianist Marika Bournaki—heard to and watched more than 100 online application videos. After an intensive two-week period, the semi-finalists who would come to Boulder were announced Aug. 1.

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Richie Hawley

“I listened several times to all the videos,” Gajić says.“It’s a really big responsibility to be the one who says this duo can enter can enter, and this duo cannot, but that’s just the nature of a competition.”

Even narrowed down to the 20 semifinalists, two full days is a lot of music by duos. “Those are long days, but our audience is really devoted to this event,” Gajić says. “I was amazed how many people stayed the whole time in 2016. Audience members develop a relationship with the performers and want them to advance to the finals, to win a prize!”

As in 2016, the competition has commissioned a work to be performed by all contestants in the semifinal round. This year’s piece, “True Green,” is by Tomasz Golka, director of the Riverside (Calif.) Philharmonic and an accomplished violinist. It is an interesting challenge for the composer to write a piece that can be played by duos with differing instruments and sonic capabilities.

The challenge for the performers is to come up with their own interpretation of a piece they have never heard or seen before, and make it fit the individual character of their instrument. “It’s really great to hear the same piece performed 20 different ways, in 20 different instrumentations, 20 different interpretations,” Gajić says.

Like most musical organizations in U.S., the Boulder International Chamber Music Competition is supported by a combination of grants and individual gifts. “I have great support from the Boulder Bach Festival, who serves as the fiscal agent, so that is extremely helpful,” Gajić says. “And we get really great support from the Boulder Convention and Visitors Bureau, who have supported us in many different ways, because we bring valuable arts tourism to Boulder.

“We’re promoting the classical music scene here, and we’re also attracting contestants ages 18–35 who are discovering Boulder. This is an event where (young artists) can gain experience, see a beautiful town in the United States, win some substantial cash prizes, and get other performance opportunities.

“I would encourage anybody to come and experience this live, because it’s something really special, and it’s happening right her in Boulder.”

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The Art of Duo
Boulder International Chamber Music Competition

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Semifinal rounds:
2–5 and 6:30–9 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 11
3–5:30 and 6:30–9 p.m. Friday, Oc.t 12
See the full list of participating duos here.

Finalist rounds and announcement of winners
1–9 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 13

Final concert: Three prize-winning duos
2 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 14

All performances in the Gordon Gamm Theater, Dairy ArtsCenter
Tickets available through the Dairy Arts Center Web page

 

Boulder Dairy Arts Center presents unusual music-video performance

Pianist David Korevaar and video artist Betsy Tobin present “Motion and Stillness”

By Peter Alexander

“Motion and Stillness,” a collaborative music and visual performance, will bring together pianist David Korevaar and multidisciplinary video artist Betsy Tobin at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19, at the Dairy Arts Center.

Pianist David Korevaar with the University of Colorado at Boulder College of Music

David Korevaar

Korevaar, the Peter and Helen Weil Professor of Piano in the CU College of Music, is one of the most active performers in the region. A member of the Boulder Piano Quartet, he often performs chamber music with his faculty colleagues and appears as concerto soloist world wide.

Tobin is director of Boulder’s Now or Never Theater, presenting unique theater performances in Colorado and elsewhere. Her performances routinely incorporate puppets, live actors, dancers, shadow theater and video.

For the Dairy performance, Korevaar will play music of Lowell Liebermann, whose works he has recorded. He also organized a festival of Liebermann’s music last year at CU. He will play two impromptus and two nocturnes by Liebermann, as well as works by Italian composer Luigi Perrachio, and the “Tempest” Sonata of Beethoven.

Betsy Tobin

Betsy Tobin

In a written communication, Korevaar said he is intrigued by working with Tobin. “She is going to do a combination of video projections and some shadow work with the music,” he wrote. “What I’ve seen so far has been interesting and engaging, but most of it will be coming together in the days just before the program.

“It’s fun to collaborate with a visual person, but also kind of new for me, so I’m looking forward to seeing how it all comes out.”

Melissa Fathman, the executive director of the Dairy Center, has said that the program is based in the concept of synesthesia, in which perceptions in one sense—such as sound—are tied to perceptions in other senses—such as vision or taste. Examples include people for whom numbers have colors, or days of the week have specific shapes. In music, the association of keys or pitches with specific colors or even tastes have been reported.

“It was my lifelong fascination with synesthesia that led to the idea for ‘Motion and Stillness,’” Fathman has written. “The recipe was quite simple: introduce two wonderfully gifted artists—a pianist and a videographer/performance artist—and invite them to create a breathtaking evening of sights and sounds. And then eagerly await their creation.”

# # # # #

Now or Never image

“Motion and Stillness”
David Korevaar, piano, and Betsy Tobin, video artist
7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19
Dairy Arts Center

Music by Lowell Liebermann, Luigi Perrachio, and Ludwig van Beethoven

Tickets

Miami String Quartet returns to the Dairy

Feb. 11 Soundscape concert is part of an extensive spring lineup

By Peter Alexander Feb. 6 at 11:30 a.m.

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Miami String Quartet

Keith Robinson, cellist of the Miami String Quartet, loves coming to Colorado.

“I fell in love with Colorado,” he says. “I think every Coloradan should feel very lucky to live in the state. It’s so beautiful. You have the best of everything!”

Including, it should be noted, a vital musical life in Boulder that includes visits by renowned artists including the Miami String Quartet.

A faculty member at Kent State University in Ohio, Robinson comes to Colorado with the other members of the quartet for regular residencies through Off the Hook Arts in Ft. Collins. Their visits often include concert performances at Boulder’s Dairy Arts Center.

Most of the residencies occur in the summer, but now a February residency enables the quartet to return to the Dairy as part of its extensive winter-spring concert schedule. The concert—4 p.m. Sunday (Feb. 11) on the Dairy’s “Soundscape” series—will feature three works from the core of the quartet repertoire: Mozart’s String Quartet in G major, K387; Shostakovich’s String Quartet No. 8; and Mendelssohn’s String Quartet in E-flat major, op. 44 no. 3. (See below for other events on the Dairy’s upcoming concert schedule.)

Keith Robinson

Keith Robinson

Robinson says that the Feb. 11 program is “pretty much our standard fare, presenting something modern in the middle, starting off with something classical and finishing with a big Romantic ender.” Of the three it’s the “big Romantic ender,” the Mendelssohn E-flat major Quartet, that falls just outside the common string quartet repertoire.

“It’s not played a lot,” Robinson says. “I’m 55 and it took me 54 years before I played it for the first time. Now I question why I didn’t know it earlier because it’s a real gem. I think audiences will find it really satisfying.”

In fact, Mendelssohn’s string quartets are less well known than those of Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven, and several 20th-century composers including Bartók and Shostakovich. But if it were up to Robinson, that would change.

“Mendelssohn is one of my favorite composers,” he says. “His scherzos, just like Midsummer Night’s Dream, are fantastic, and all of the quartets have a movement like that. His slow movements can be very, very pure and Romantic, as this one is. But it’s the high energy stuff that really turns me on. Mendelssohn is always a high energy composer.”

The other two works on the program have both already been played in Boulder this year, Mozart’s Quartet in G major on the Takacs Quartet program last weekend, and the Shostakovich Eighth Quartet by the Altius Quartet in January.

Composed when Mozart was just 26, the G major Quartet marks the beginning of the composer’s mature instrumental style. Already an accomplished opera composer, Mozart had written a number of quartets, all of them short works written for entertainment. But after playing and studying Haydn’s latest string quartets, Mozart started writing pieces that were larger in scope and more serious in manner.

“This was big step for Mozart,” Robinson says. ”The younger quartets are really nice, they’re really sweet, but the G major Quartet is really stepping into Haydn’s (stylistic) territory.” Today, Haydn’s six String Quartets op. 33 and the six quartets Mozart wrote in response, starting with K387, are considered landmarks of the Classical style.

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Dmitri Shostakovich

The Eighth is probably the most played of Shostakovich’s 15 quartets. Composed at a low point of the composer’s life, it is a gloomy but powerful work. It is also a highly personal one that reflects upon the composer’s own struggles in the Soviet Union. Shostakovich quoted his own earlier works, and put his musical initials in the form of a series of notes representing D-S-C-H (D-E flat-C-B natural) throughout the quartet. (Read more about the background and the music of the Eighth Quartet here.)

To Robinson, the Eighth Quartet is an essential piece of music that he teaches to all of his students. “Every string quartet should play No. 8 because it is so good,” he says. “It deserves all of the attention it gets, because it is superbly written. There’s not a note out of place.

“It’s very direct. And that’s what I like about Shostakovich: it speaks to you. I think everyone can take something away from Shostakovich 8.”

# # # # #

Soundscape: The Miami String Quartet
4 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 11
Gordon Gamm Theater; Dairy Arts Center

Mozart: String Quartet in G major, K387
Shostakovich: String Quartet No. 8
Mendelssohn: String Quartet in E-flat major, op. 44 no. 3

Tickets

04-Dairy_Center_for_the_Arts.jpgOther Dairy Center music events
Spring 2018

CU@The Dairy: Worlds Around Us—John Gunther & Friends
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 21
The Gordon Gamm Theater

Twilight Studios: Ghost Ship of State
8 p.m. Saturday, March 3
The Carsen Theater

Jazz at the Dairy: Flowers of Evil
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 14
The Gordon Gamm Theater

Boulder Opera Company: Così Fan Tutte by Mozart, piano dress rehearsal
7 p.m. Tuesday, March 20
The Gordon Gamm Theater

One Night Only: Hope Lives
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, March 21
The Gordon Gamm Theater

Boulder Opera Company: Così Fan Tutte by Mozart
3 p.m. Sunday, March 25
The Gordon Gamm Theater

One Night Only: Colorado Classics
7:30 p.m. Thursday, April 05
The Gordon Gamm Theater

Jazz at the Dairy: Angels & Devils
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, April 18
The Gordon Gamm Theater

Soundscape: Katie Glassman & Snapshot|
2 p.m. Wednesday, April 25
The Gordon Gamm Theater

One Night Only: MahlerFest XXXI
7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 16
The Gordon Gamm Theater

Soundscape: The Elixir of Love
2 p.m. Wednesday, May 30
The Gordon Gamm Theater, Boulder

More information and tickets available on the Dairy Center Web page.

2017: The Year in Classical Music

Some outstanding concerts, and some changes of leadership in Boulder

By Peter Alexander

With the year drawing to a close, it is time to look back at 2017. It has been a tumultuous year in many realms, including some aspects of Classical music. But before that, it is good to remember the outstanding musical experiences of 2017 here in the Boulder area.

Pro Musica

The year began on an expressive high point when Pro Musical Colorado Chamber Orchestra, conductor Cynthia Katsarelis and soloists Jennifer Bird-Arvidsson, soprano, and Ashraf Sewailam, bass, presented Shostakovich’s rarely-heard Symphony No. 14.

I wrote at the time: “This somewhat gloomy meditation on death is not often given live, partly because of the difficult assignments facing the soprano and bass soloists, but mostly because of the difficult subject matter. But it is a major statement from a great composer—what Katsarelis calls ‘a piece that needs to be heard’—and so the rare performances are to be treasured.”

The February visit of Deborah (Call Me Debbie) Voigt to Macky Auditorium will be a cherished memory for fans of the classical voice. Voigt Lessons, the superstar soprano’s candid retelling of her struggles with relationships, substances, and weight that clouded her career not only showed some realities of life at the top of the opera world, it also revealed the very human person beneath the superstar image. For both reasons, this was a meaningful event.

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Takacs Quartet

The Takacs Quartet always provides some of the year’s best performances. It’s hard to chose just one, but for 2017 I would single out their February concert including Beethoven’s Quartet in G major, op. 18 no. 2—performed while the Takacs was in the midst of a full Beethoven cycle at several venues—and CU music faculty Daniel Silver, clarinet, playing the Brahms Quintet in B minor, op. 115. An especially beautiful rendering of this beautiful work had at least one audience member in tears by the end.

March saw the arrival of another superstar in Boulder when Sir James Galway played at Macky Auditorium, and the departure of an important member of Boulder’s classical music community when Evanne Browne gave her farewell concert with Seicento Baroque Ensemble, the organization she founded in 2011.

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Boulder Phil at Kennedy Center

One of the biggest events of the year for Boulder performing arts was the visit in March of the Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra, conductor Michael Butterman and Frequent Flyers Aerial Dance Company to the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., for the first annual Shift Festival of American Orchestras. The Phil repeated a concert they had given in Boulder a few days earlier, including the world premiere of All the Songs that Nature Sings by Stephen Lias and Copland’s Appalachian Spring, performed with Frequent Flyers.

An audience favorite of the festival, the Boulder Phil played to a sold out house. Butterman wrote the next day, “It was a peak experience for me, and, I think, for all of us at the Phil. . . . To be there with our orchestra, with that crowd and with that repertoire—it was something I shall never forget. We had a great sense of pride in representing our hometown.”

Several important changes of personnel were announced for Boulder classical scene in the spring. In April, Jean-Marie Zeitouni announced that he was stepping down as music director of the Colorado Music Festival. He will remain with CMF as principal guest conductor, and conductor/violinist Peter Oundjian will serve as artistic advisor for the 2018 season. Later the same month, James Bailey left his position as music curator of the Dairy Arts Center, to be replaced by Sharon Park.

Elliot Moore at Lake McIntosh - credit - Photography Maestro (1)

Elliott Moore

In May, Seicento Baroque Ensemble announced the appointment of Kevin T. Padworksi as artistic director, succeeding Browne, and the Longmont Symphony announced the appointment of Elliot Moore to succeed long-time music director Robert Olson.

The same month, the Boulder Chamber Orchestra wrapped up its 2016–17 season with its largest performance to date, Beethoven’s Ninth Symphony presented in Macky Auditorium. The performance under conductor Bahman Saless was unfortunately the occasion of a protest by the anti-fracking group East Boulder County United. Seven members of EBCU blew whistles, shouted slogans and left flyers before the concert to voice their opposition to the orchestra having accepted a contribution from Extraction Oil & Gas.

Olga Kern

Olga Kern, photographed by Chris Lee at Steinway Hall.

Zeitouni proved to be anything but a lame duck conductor at the Colorado Music Festival. The 2017 season started at the end of June with an all-Russian program featuring exciting performances of Shostakovich’s Festive Overture and Rachmaninoff’s Second Symphony. On the same concert, one of Boulder’s favorite guest artists, pianist Olga Kern, gave scintillating performances of Prokofiev’s First Piano Concerto and Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini.

Other high points over the summer included the return of CMF’s founding director Giora Bernstein to lead a concert of Mozart, Zeitouni conducting Beethoven’s Ninth as the CMF centerpiece, and the visit of violinist Gil Shaham at the end of the summer season. Up in the mountains, Central City Opera’s Downton-Abbey-inspired Victorian-era production of Mozart’s Così fan tutte was one of the year’s highlights for opera lovers.

Another delight for the opera crowd came in the fall, with the CU Eklund Opera Program’s serio-comic production of Lehar’s Merry Widow. In November, Saless and the Boulder Chamber Orchestra returned to its core repertoire with a lively concert featuring two youthful works for smaller ensemble: the Concerto for piano, violin and strings by the 14-year-old Mendelssohn, with violinist Zachary Carrettin and pianist Mina Gajić, and Janáček’s Idyll for Strings.

Zachary & Mina

Carrettin and Gajic

Carrettin and Gajić were featured performers in December when the Boulder Bach Festival gave one of its most intriguing and adventurous concerts in its increasingly adventurous schedule. With guest artist Richie Hawley, the program offered insight into the instruments and performance practices of the early 20th century, performed on Hawley’s 1919 Buffet clarinet, Gajić’s 1895 Érard piano, and Carrettin’s violin set up with strings typical of the period.

 

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For the classical music world outside of Boulder, the biggest news was certainly the intrusion of a long-overdue reckoning for sexual misconduct that is going on in our society generally. The first bombshell, not unexpected by people in the business but a bombshell nonetheless, landed Dec. 3 with the suspension of conductor James Levine from the Metropolitan Opera and other organizations, including the Boston Symphony and the Ravinia Festival. Accusations against Charles Dutoit, artistic director and principal conductor of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in London, surfaced later in the month.

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James Levine

Both conductors are in the twilight of long careers. Rumors about Levine have been widely known in the classical music world; indeed I first heard them in the 1980s. Every music journalist I know has heard the same stories, but so far as I am aware, no one who experienced Levine’s assaults was previously willing to speak publicly. In the case of Dutoit, I had not heard the rumors, but I do know one of the women who spoke publicly about what happened to her, and I believe her unquestioningly.

As the controversy has swirled about the subject of sexual abuse, harassment and assault in classical music, several critics have written powerfully about the subject: Anne Midgette of the Washington Post, Jennifer Johnson of the Guardian, Andrew Riddles of Classical Ottawa to name three. Singer Susanne Mentzer has written about her personal experiences in the opera world for the Huffington Post, as has Dan Kempson for Medium.

There are certain to be more revelations. One major journalist has more first-hand information, with names including some of the of the most famous classical artists, and is preparing an article. I have no doubt that several men are nervously awaiting that story, or some other revelation that reveals past misdeeds.

Will this tidal wave reach Boulder?

It’s hard to say with certainty. I have spoken with many on the classical scene here, and the only rumor I have heard, from several sources, has been of inappropriate comments and behavior by one person, none of which reached the level of abuse or assault. “He might not have been hired today,” one person speculated, but as so often happens, the people who heard the comments preferred not to make an issue of it.

Another person told me he had never heard any rumor from the College of Music, so Boulder may escape the worst of this necessary but unhappy process. In the meantime, it is my wish for 2018 that society in general and the music world specifically create a safe environment, where powerful men do not feel free to behave like adolescent boys.

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Edited for clarity 12.31.17

Composer Lowell Liebermann will have residency at CU Boulder College of Music

Public performances Oct. 18 & 19 provide an introduction to his music

By Peter Alexander

If you don’t know the music of American composer Lowell Liebermann, the coming week is your opportunity.

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Composer Lowell Lieberman. Photo by Christian Steiner

Actually, if you do know his music, the coming week is an opportunity, too. The composer of accessible, intriguing, and often surprising works in many different genres, Liebermann will be in residence at the CU College of Music through Thursday (Oct. 19). The residency includes two full programs of Liebermann’s music—at noon Wednesday at the Dairy Arts Center and at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Grusin Concert Hall. (See the schedule below for details and admission information.)

A Roser Visiting Artist at CU, Liebermann was invited by Peter and Helen Weil Prof. of Piano David Korevaar, who met Liebermann when they were both undergraduates at Juilliard. “We’ve known each other since we were, dare I say, still teenagers!” Korevaar says. “And I’ve been interested in his music ever since.”

Korevaar has been playing some of Liebermann’s pieces in concerts over the past year, and just completed a recording of his music. “I was thinking very much about Lowell,” he says, “so I thought it would be great to have him come. [CU composition professor] Dan Kellogg was very supportive and together we applied for funding from the Roser Visiting Artist’s Fund.”

As part of the Roser fund’s support, Liebermann will be meeting with many different groups of CU students this week. Activities include masterclasses with piano and flute students, coachings with all the performers of his works being presented during the residency, and extensive work with composition students.

Korevaar

David Korevaar

For those who may not know Liebermann’s music, Korevaar explains that it’s “accessible in the best sense. Often very lyrical, often dramatic. There’s a lot of variety— what he’s got first of all is an amazing craft. He can write anything, and for anything. He also has a great imagination, but he manages to integrate everything so well.

“His music, especially what he wrote in the 1990s, tended to have a lot of very, shall we say, nominally pleasant and familiar sounds. And some of it is not pleasant—one of the things that Lowell can do is really create some nightmarish sounds. He’ll do that by twisting your expectations, but he balances it well. He knows how to balance things, as any good composer does.”

Korevaar, who has been very busy with performances lately, from Beethoven with the Boulder Philharmonic to several Faculty Tuesday recitals and a Brahms concerto on tour, will be part of several of the performances. In spite of everything on his plate, he likes Liebermann’s music so much that he was unable to resist joining in.

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Jennifer Hayghe

“My original plan when I put this whole thing together was I wasn’t going to do any of the playing,” he says. “But how can I not put myself in? Lowell has some recent chamber pieces that he was particularly interested having done, plus there was the Sonata for Two Pianos, and I thought that would be a great piece for me to finally get to play with Jennifer Hayghe.”

The performances during the coming week will feature Korevaar and other CU faculty, students and alumni. Several of the piano pieces are included, played by different artists, including Liebermann himself Wednesday at the Dairy.

A number of chamber pieces are also included in the two concerts, among them the Flute Sonata—probably Liebermann’s best known work—performed by flutist Joshua Hall and pianist Cecilia Kao, and the Sonata for Two Pianos by Korevaar and Hayghe.

Another that Korevaar thinks is especially impressive to hear is the Trio for clarinet, viola and piano, which he will play with clarinetist Daniel Silver and violist Ericka Eckert. (The full program for both concerts is listed below.) There will also be a talk-back with the composer following the Wednesday performance at the Dairy.

If you need one more reason to attend the concerts, Korevaar points out that there will plenty of flash and dazzle on display, including the Trio for clarinet, viola and piano. “I think one of the reasons that Lowell’s music has been very successful is that he also understands instrumental virtuosity, and there’s plenty of that,” he says.

“His music can be very brilliant and very showy.”

# # # # #

Lowell Liebermann Residency
CU Boulder College of Music

Public events:

Libermann.01

Liebermann

2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 16, Grusin Concert Hall
Piano class, with CU students playing works by Lowell Liebermann

3:30 pm. Tuesday, Oct. 17, Room NB59, Imig Music Building
Flute Class, Christian Jennings Studio

12 noon Wednesday, Oct. 18, Dairy Arts Center
Soundscape at the Dairy: Music of Lowell Liebermann

—Piano Quartet: Sharon Park, violin; Stephanie Mientka, viola; Zachary Reaves, cello; Sarah Rushing, piano
—Elegy for Clarinet and Piano: Emily Wrangler, clarinet; Adam Coleman, piano
—Nocturne No. 2: Ryan Grippo, piano
—Nocturne No. 7: Sophia Zervas, piano
—Nocturne No. 10: Lowell Liebermann, piano
—Trio for clarinet, viola and piano: Daniel Silver, clarinet; Ericka Eckert, viola; David Korevaar, piano
—Post-concert talkback with Lowell Liebermann, David Korevaar, and Sharon Park

Tickets

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 19, Grusin Concert Hall
Faculty/student recital of music by Lowell Liebermann

—Flute Sonata: Joshua Hall, flute, and Cecilia Kao, piano
—Nocturne No. 8: Maria Wietrzynska, piano
—Piano Trio No. 3: Charles Wetherbee, violin; David Requiro, cello; David Korevaar, piano
—Violin Sonata: William Terwilliger, violin, and Andrew Cooperstock, piano
—Sonata for Two Pianos: Jennifer Hayghe and David Korevaar
—Daydream and Nightmare for two pianos, eight hands: Sarah Rushing, Jonathan Morris, Nathália Kato, and Barbara Noyes

Free and open to the public.
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Edited 10.16 to correct the names of performers due to last-minute schedule changes.

Mozart, movies and more at the Dairy

2017–18 concert season gets underway at the Dairy Arts Center

By Peter Alexander

Some of Boulder’s best musicians want to see you at the Dairy.

Korevaar

Pianist David Korenaar

That’s the punning implication of the new series CU@The Dairy, presented jointly by the Dairy Arts Center and University of Colorado College of Music. That concert series opens Thursday, Sept. 7 with “Miraculous Mozart,” a program of Mozart piano concertos with David Korevaar, the Helen and Peter Weil Professor of Piano, doubling as soloist and conductor, and continues eight days later, Friday, Sept. 15, with a screening of the 1918 film The Yellow Ticket with live music performed by klezmer violinist Alicia Svigals and pianist Marilyn Lerner.

“Miraculous Mozart” will feature two of Mozart’s piano concertos, K449 in E-flat major and K450 in B-flat major, with Korevaar leading and playing with a chamber orchestra.

Yellow_Ticket_in_Vancouver_2

Alicia Svigals and Marilyn Lerner performing for a screening of ‘The Yellow Ticket’

A silent film from 1918, The Yellow Ticket is of great historical interest for several reasons: It was filmed in the Warsaw Ghetto; it features a teenaged Pola Negri, who went on to great fame as a femme fatale in Hollywood; and it was reconstructed from various partial sources after the Nazis tried to destroy all traces of the film in the 1940s.

Read more in Boulder Weekly.

 

September music events at the Dairy:

CU@The Dairy: Miraculous Mozart
David Korevaar, piano, and chamber orchestra.
7:30 p.m. Sept. 7

The Yellow Ticket
Film screening with live music
Alicia Svigals, violin, and Marilyn Lerner, piano.
8 p.m. Sept. 15 [note corrected time]

Jazz at the Dairy: From Peru to Mexico.
Guitarist Alfredo Muro with former Dairy music curator James Bailey, cello.
7:30 p.m. Sept. 16

Soundscape: Women in Classical Music.
2 p.m. Sept. 20

One Night Only: Shake, Schimmel, and Shout!
7:30 p.m. Sept. 27

Other fall dates and ticket information here.

NOTE: The time of the screening of The Yellow Ticket has been corrected to 8 p.m. An earlier version of the story listed the time as 7:30 p.m.

CU music faculty will appear on a new concert series at the Dairy Center

“CU at the Dairy” opens Sept. 7 with “Miraculous Mozart”

By Peter Alexander

Two of Boulder’s eminent arts organizations have joined together to inaugurate a promising new collaborative music series this fall.

The University of Colorado College of Music and the Dairy Arts Center have announced a series of concerts jointly sponsored by both organizations, to be held during the year in the Dairy’s Grace and Gordon Gamm Theater. “CU at the Dairy,” featuring music faculty members in collaboration with one another and other local artists, will supplement the free Faculty Tuesdays series of recitals in Grusin Hall.

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The lobby of the Grace and Gordon Gamm Theater at the Dairy Arts Center

Based on early listings, the Grusin Hall Faculty Tuesday events will be more traditional recitals, while the CU at the Dairy will be more exploratory, collaborative, and in some cases will be multi-media events. In a news release from Aug. 16, the Dairy’s music curator, Sharon Park, says that the CU faculty “have such great ideas and projects they want to present. The Gordon [Gamm Theater] gives them an intimate venue to pair visual art, silent film, dance or any other art form with music.”

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David Korenaar

The series gets underway Sept. 7 with “Miraculous Mozart,” featuring Helen and Peter Weil Professor of Piano David Korevaar playing and conducting Mozart’s piano concertos K449 in E-flat major and K450 in B-flat major. The small orchestra for these performances will include violinist Charles Wetherbee from the music faculty along with other faculty and alumni of the College of Music.

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Alicia Svigals performing “The Yellow Ticket” in Vancouver

The following week a multi-media event will bring together representatives of the College of Music, CU’s Program in Jewish Studies and International Film Series. Yonatan Malin, faculty in the music theory area of the College of Music, will host the screening of “The Yellow Ticket” a silent film from 1918. The film, about a young Jewish woman studying medicine in Tsarist Russia, will be accompanied by Klezmer violinist Alicia Svigals and jazz pianist Marilyn Lerner performing Svigals’s original score live. Malin will also moderate a panel discussion with the performers and CU faculty members about film, music and cultural awareness.

“CU at the Dairy” will continue in the spring with a performance by Thompson Jazz Studies director John Gunther and friends. More details about these performances will appear on this Web page and in the pages of Boulder Weekly.

Tickets for all “CU at the Dairy” performances are available through the Dairy Center Box Office.