Longmont Symphony opens virtual fall season Sunday

Concert will introduce new concertmaster and associate concertmaster

By Peter Alexander Oct. 8 at 1:05 p.m.

The Longmont Symphony opens its fall 2020 half season of online concerts, “(Re)Sounding,” Sunday, Oct. 11. Music director Elliot Moore will conduct a program of music for strings, featuring Bach’s popular Concerto in D minor for two violins and orchestra —widely known as the “Bach Double Concerto.”

The soloists will be orchestra’s new concertmaster and associate concertmaster, Benjamin Ehrmentraut and Kina Ono. Other works on the program are three string serenades by Mozart, written when the composer was 16.

Elliot Moore and the Longmont Symphony Orchestra

Because of limitations imposed by the Coronavirus pandemic, Moore says, “I decided to pick music that I felt could be rehearsed and performed in one day. To this end, I’ve picked some of my favorite Mozart divertimenti that I listened to during quarantine. They’re also called his Salzburg symphonies.

“I wanted to also feature our new concertmaster and associate concertmaster as soloists. So they will be performing the Bach Double Violin Concerto.”

The concert will be recorded in the Longmont Museum’s Stewart Auditorium for later broadcast on the LSO’s YouTube channel and on Longmont’s Public Media (LPM) channel. The recording will be engineered by LPM. The premiere broadcast of the first concert will be shown at 4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11, and will be available for a period of time afterwards.

Benjamin Ehrmantraut

Ehrmantraut, a native of Bismarck, N.D., began musical studies at age 9. He received a bachelor’s degree in violin performance from Concordia College in Moorhead, Minn., and a master’s degree from CU, Boulder, studying with violinist Károly Schranz, who played second violin tin the Takács Quartet for 43 years. Before moving to Colorado, Ehrmantraut played with the Fargo/Moorhead and Bismarck/Mandan symphony orchestras. 

He currently plays with the Boulder Symphony. Chamber music is another part of his career, including performing in at Dakota Chamber Music in North Dakota, in Vermont at the Green Mountain Chamber Music Festival, and in Texas at the Round Top Festival Institute.

Kin Ono

Ono has played in professional orchestras in and near her home state of Minnesota. Since moving to Colorado, she has joined the Boulder Philharmonic, Boulder Symphony and the Cheyenne Symphony. In Minnesota she has performed at the Ordway Music Theater and Concert Hall, Orpheum Theater, Target Center, and Xcel Energy Center, and placed first in the 2016 Schubert Club Competition. She is currently a master’s of student at CU, Boulder. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota, where she studied with Sally O’Reilly.

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Longmont Symphony Orchestra, Elliot Moore, conductor
With Benjamin Ehrmantraut and Kina Ono, violins
4 p.m. Sunday, Oc. 11—online only

J.S. Bach: Concerto in D minor for two violins and orchestra, S1043 (“Double Violin Concerto”)
Mozart: Divertimento in D major, K136 (“Salzburg Symphony No. 1”)
Divertimento in B-flat major, K137 (“Salzburg Symphony No. 2”)
Divertimento in F major, K138 (“Salzburg Symphony No. 3”)

Other concerts of the fall 2020 half season

“Los Angeles to Longmont”
Caroline Campbell, violin
Program tba
4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 25

“Seattle to Longmont”
Nathan Lee, piano
Program tba
4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 25

Handel’s Messiah, Solo Sections
Longmont Symphony, Elliot Moore, conductor
With four vocal soloists to be named later
Handel: Messiah solo pieces
“Hallelujah” Chorus
4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 13

Half-season subscriptions and access to individual concert streams may be purchased here

Longmont Symphony’s virtual fall season celebrates orchestra’s return

“(Re)Sounding! 2020 Reimagined” opens Oct. 11 with Bach and Mozart

By Peter Alexander Sept. 29 at 12:45 p.m.

Elliot Moore is more than ready to get back to work.

The conductor of the Longmont Symphony designed the orchestra’s fall season to celebrate playing together again after COVID forced the suspension of the last season in April. “It’s been a very long pause for us,” he says. “It’s been a very long pause for every single orchestra across the country, across the world really, and we wanted to have a celebration that our sounds continue.”

Longmont Symphony conductor Elliot Moore

In that spirit, the LSO is calling the fall half-season “(Re)Sounding: 2020 Reimagined.” There will be two concerts featuring a small orchestra—cut down to observe safe distancing—and two programs featuring guest artists.

The orchestra was on the brink of canceling the rest of 2020, but “I kept thinking about how we could do (a fall season),” Moore says. “There’s so many constraints now, so the idea that I had was to have bookends that are the orchestra—but it has to be obviously a very small orchestra. That already is a large constraint.

Violinist Caroline Campbell

“And in the middle of our fall season, I wanted to showcase soloists that would enhance the season, and who even though they’re in their homes and not in Longmont, would still be a draw for our audience. To that end I picked an incredible violinist named Caroline Campbell, who is the go-to violinist for many artists including Barbara Streisand and Andrea Bocelli. She has had videos on YouTube with 34 million views.”

For the other guest artist, Moore selected pianist Nathan Lee, who won the Young Concert Artists International Audition at 15. Still in his teens, he is a musical ambassador to younger audiences. “He is just a beautifully thoughtful, poetic musician and pianist,” Moore says. “I thought not only would he be a draw for our patrons, but also that may be a way to get him virtually in the schools to talk with students.”

Following each solo performance, there will be a live Q&A session with the guest artist, speaking from their home, with Moore serving as moderator from Longmont.

Pianist Nathan Lee. Photo by Chris Lee.

Both LSO performances will be recorded in the Longmont Museum in advance of the online broadcast. The orchestra will play music by Bach on Mozart on Sunday, Oct. 11, including Bach’s Concerto for two violins, featuring the LSO’s new concertmaster and associate concertmaster, Benjamin Ehrmantraut and Kina Ono. The opposite bookend, Sunday, Dec. 13, will be a holiday program with music from Handel’s Messiah with four solo singers performing solo pieces, and joining together for the “Hallelujah Chorus.”

“I think that it’s imperative that we give [the audience] not only a good sound quality, but also a good visual quality,” Moore says. Having worked on streamed performances by the Detroit Symphony, he is working with the cameramen in planning the streams. “We’re talking about different shots, different camera angles and even more than that,” he says. 

“I’m also speaking with someone who’s going to be our host, so we can have a curated experience. These are all new things for us, but I have full confidence in the staff of the Longmont Symphony, and with our collaborators from Longmont Public Media, who are working so beautifully with us to bring all of this to life.”

Both individual concert and fall season virtual tickets are available from the LSO Web page. Each virtual ticket allows the holder to view the performance at their convenience, starting at the listed performance times. Each performance will be available for a period of time after the premiere.

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(Re)Sounding: 2020 Reimagined
Longmont Symphony
(Streamed performances; admission through the LSO Web page)

Bach “Double” and Mozart “Salzburg symphonies”
Longmont Symphony, Elliot Moore, conductor
With Benjamin Ehrmantraut and Kina Ono, violins

J.S. Bach: Concerto for two violins and orchestra, BWV1043
Mozart: Divertimento in D major, K136
Divertimento in B-flat major, K137
Divertimento in F major, K138

4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 11

“Los Angeles to Longmont”
Caroline Campbell, violin
Program tba
4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 25

“Seattle to Longmont”
Nathan Lee, piano
Program tba
4 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 25

Handel’s Messiah, Solo Sections
Longmont Symphony, Elliot Moore, conductor
With four vocal soloists to be named later

Handel: Messiah solo pieces
“Hallelujah” Chorus

4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 13

“Music and Moore,” a classical-music TV show for young and old

Shows feature conductor Elliot Moore, the Longmont Symphony and a Beethoven wig

By Izzy Fincher Sept. 15 at 11:10 a.m.

Elliot Moore had to reimagine the 2020-21 season. It started with a TV show. 

“I have always had a belief that we need to bring the art to the people, not that the people have to come to the concert hall,” Moore, the conductor of the Longmont Symphony Orchestra, says. “We need to make the artists, who perform the music, accessible to the public. Due to social distancing, I thought to myself, a television show is a way of bringing the music to the people.”

Elliot Moore, host of “Music and Moore”

This led to the creation of the program “Music and Moore,” produced by the Longmont Symphony Orchestra and Moore. New episodes are released every other week in partnership with Longmont Public Media.

Hokusai: “The Great Wave off Kanagawa”

The first episode, released Aug. 21, explores Smetana’s symphonic poem Vltava, known in English as The Moldau.Composed in 1874, The Moldau depicts the longest river in Bohemia, or today’s Czech Republic, a source of national pride for Smetana. Continuing the theme of water, the second episode, released Sept. 4, focuses on Debussy’s La Mer (The sea) and his inspiration from Hokusai’s print “The Great Wave off Kanagawa.” Both episodes include LSO’s own archived performances from 2018, filmed and produced by Phil Huff. 

Moore also diversifies the show with other content. He believes music alone is not enough outside of the concert hall, so he hopes to create “a fusion of Mr. Rodgers meets world news tonight,” allowing for “depth with entertainment and educational value,” he says.

The show has a bit of everything—music history, comedic relief, coffee-making, interviews, archived performances, new virtual collaborations and a fan Q&A. He even dresses up as Beethoven with a scraggly brown wig and vaguely German accent, to make the show “feel a little bit less isolating,” he says.

Moore hopes the Beethoven persona and fun approach to classical music will engage a younger audience. He says he wants to “create connections between school children and the Longmont Symphony.” Learning packets for each episode, created by music educators, also increase engagement and serve as an educational resource for local K–12 students and teachers. 

Elliot Moore in his more familiar role, conductor

Beyond Longmont’s youth, Moore hopes to reach a wide audience in terms of age and classical music knowledge. 

“I’m not sure if it matters how old you are,” Moore says. “I think it can be pretty easily understood from a third grader to a musicologist. It’s fun, and it’s light in a way they can relate to. What I hope is that it breaks down some barriers. It can be sophisticated, but at the same it is very basic and very human. It’s something we all experience.”

In future episodes, Moore hopes to move beyond music history to relevant topics of social justice, classical music stigmas and diversity. He also looks forward to in-person conversations on “Music and Moore” when the LSO can safely resume, though Beethoven will still be his favorite co-host.

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“Music and Moore”
Featuring Elliot Moore, the Longmont Symphony and “Beethoven”

Episode 3 to be released Sept. 18. 

Musicians in their Lairs IV: Elliot Moore

Reading, playing Bach, and looking to the future of the Longmont Symphony

By Peter Alexander May 9 at 10:03 a.m.

Elliot Moore is sitting in his home in Erie, where he is sheltering in place with his wife, his six-month-old daughter and four dogs, and he seems pretty happy there.

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Elliot Moore, at home in Erie

“It’s actually been very nice,” he says via Skype. “It was really nice to have two weeks at least where it was pretty much me and my wife at home with [our daughter].”

Moore is the music director of the Longmont Symphony. His wife is a physician who does rehabilitation medicine, so she is able to do some of her work online. “She’s been doing telemedicine, but she has one facility that she sees that has COVID patients,” Moore says.

When she does go to see patients in person, she has a routine to keep the rest of the family safe. “She has clothes that she keeps in the garage,” he explains. ”As soon as she gets home she gets into clean clothes, immediately takes a shower, and then she’ll put on other clothes.

“She doesn’t want to bring any clothes into the house that have been exposed to patients who may have COVID-19.”

Apart from that risk, he is relieved that the pandemic hit when it did. “When I think about our daughter’s age, I don’t think we could be more lucky,” he says. “I am grateful that she won’t remember any of this. She doesn’t want to hang out with her friends, she doesn’t think her parents are annoying and dumb—thank goodness that we are her world and she doesn’t feel stuck at home.”

Other than entertaining her daughter and changing the occasional diaper, Moore has plenty to do. “I’m writing much more,” he says. “I have blog that I write, and I’ve called many of our symphony supporters and checked in with them to make sure that they’re doing OK.

“’I’m happy to say that they were all happy and healthy—maybe a little lonely, a little stir crazy, but besides that everyone’s fine.”

Moore works to keep from going stir crazy himself. “Everything seems to be changing on a daily basis, so at first I was really focused on things that I could control, mental health type things” he says. “Making sure that I’m OK, that my wife is OK, that our daughter is OK, that her parents are OK—that was my focus for probably for three weeks or so.”

He found that one thing he could control was playing music. “At the beginning, one of my coping mechanisms was to play the cello, maybe 30 minutes a day,” he says. “It was mostly solo Bach. I thought it would be really nice to have music in the house, have my daughter hear me playing the cello. I found it very relaxing and good for the soul to be paying Bach.

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Elliot Moore in his study with one of his dogs

“Once I knew that everything was OK, I started thinking about what is next season [at the LSO] going to look like— programming, guest artists. I started getting more down to that kind of work. I’ve never had this much time to put together a season!”

The big challenge that Moore and the LSO are facing—along with every other orchestra and music presenter in the country—is uncertainty. “How will things be different when we go back?” Moore asks. “Our hall seats roughly 1300 people. Are we going to have to cap it at 500 people? At 750 people? How do we deal with all of that? Spacing between seats? And the musicians?

“These are all aspects that I think all orchestras are probably thinking about. But it changes so quickly that until we know more, we need to have this on our minds, to consider different options, and then when it comes closer to concert season, to be thinking much more seriously how we actually go about doing that.”

It appears increasingly likely that for many organizations around the world, sharing performances by video streaming is going to be part of the answer. Here Moore has valuable insight, having worked with the Detroit Symphony on live streaming concerts in the past.

There are many financial and contractual hurdles that have to be figured out, but there are also advantages that Moore sees coming from sharing concerts online, “For an orchestra like the Longmont Symphony, people may start developing an affinity for certain sections of the orchestra, and feel like they get to know [the players] through live streaming,” he says.

“One of the things I am happy that we have done in the last three years is to do videos. We have a YouTube channel, but it’s not enough to just stream the concerts. It’s like television, where there should be an interview with a musician behind the scenes during intermission.

“These are all critical aspects to making this successful, as I saw with the Detroit Symphony from the time that I was sitting in broom closet with two other people, to the state-of-the-art room that has been built. They bought, I think it’s 15 cameras and there’s a whole team. [Today] there’s close to 12 or 15 people making their live Webcasts happen.”

Another part of Moore’s routine under quarantine has been reading. “One of the things that I quickly started doing was reading books,” he says. He was particularly drawn to stories about conductors and other musicians who had gone through war, political oppression, and other struggles in their lives. “It was good for me to read about performing artists who had to weather the storm,” he says. “

There were plenty of other storms before we came along. So that did give me some perspective, I think.”

LSO at Stewart Auditorium: Lesser known Beethoven and Schubert

Longmont Symphony extends its Beethoven symphony cycle, Feb. 29 & March 1

By Peter Alexander Feb. 25 at  11 p.m.

The Longmont Symphony and conductor Elliot Moore continue their ongoing cycle of Beethoven symphonies with concerts at the Longmont Museum Stewart Auditorium Saturday and Sunday (Feb. 29 and March 1; details below).

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Longmont Symphony Chamber Orchestra in Stewart Auditorium. Photo by Peter Alexander.

The program features one of Beethoven’s least-performed symphonies, No. 4 in B-flat major, as well as Schubert’s Symphony No. 5 in B-flat major. “It’s Beethoven’s Fourth and of course, it’s known,” Moore says. “But these are pieces that are not the meat and potatoes of either composer.

“The Ninth Symphony of Schubert is performed much more often than the Fifth symphony. Schubert’s Eighth Symphony is performed much more often than the Fifth. For a Beethoven symphony, the Fourth is pretty rarely performed. So it’s a concert that is great repertoire, but that is a little bit underperformed.”

It is specifically repertoire that Moore has wanted to bring to the Longmont Symphony from the day he arrived. For both the players and the audiences, it is important to know these earlier symphonies, he says.

Elliot Moore - credit - Photography Maestro

Elliot Moore. Photo by Photography Maestro.

“Early Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn: these are composers that in the history of the Longmont Symphony are generally underrepresented. In fact, I think that this is the Longmont premiere of Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony.

“It’s important for a musical organization to have these pieces in their repertoire, and also know the style. This style can lead to how we interpret Schumann, to how we interpret Brahms. It’s important that we not have holes in our collective education of where does the symphony come from. It’s important that we do all of these symphonies, and I wanted to begin right at the beginning of my tenure as music director.”

Both symphonies were written in the early years of the 19th century—Beethoven in 1808, Schubert in 1816—and early in each composer’s symphonic careers. But both are also works that look back to the 18th century, rather than forward to the Romantic era that was just getting started in music.

“The thing that is interesting to me is that Beethoven had just composed his Third Symphony, and when he wrote his Fourth, he looked much further back rather than forward into what the symphony would become,” Moore says. “He went back more toward Haydn.

“In Schubert’s case, instead of looking at Beethoven and what Beethoven had written, he was more inspired by Mozart in this symphony. So both symphonies have a very classical sense to them.”

Both are works that Moore is looking forward to conducting. “Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony is one of the most energetic and spirited symphonies,” he says. “It will be a lot of fun to bring this light-hearted work to our audience. That’s one of the things I’m looking forward to with Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony.

“With Schubert’s Fifth, it’s how to me it sounds like an extension of Mozart. It’s as if we’ve got Mozart’s 42nd Symphony, and that’s something that I am really looking forward to bringing to life.”

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Stewart.Night.PMA

Longmont Museum Stewart Auditorium. Photo by Peter Alexander.

Beethoven Cycle: Beethoven and Schubert
Longmont Symphony Chamber Orchestra
Elliot Moore, conductor

Schubert: Symphony No. 5 in B-flat major
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 in B-flat major

7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 29
4 p.m. Sunday, March 1 [sold out]
Stewart Auditorium, Longmont Museum

Tickets

 

‘Thread of destiny’ runs through Longmont Symphony’s Feb. 15 program

Violinist Andrew Sords and Longmont Youth Symphony will join the LSO onstage

By Peter Alexander Feb. 13 at 2:20 p.m.

The next concert by the Longmont Symphony Orchestra (7:30 p.m. Saturday at Vance Brand Civic Auditorium) is steeped in the idea of destiny.

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Elliot Moore and the Longmont Symphony Orchestra

The concert is titled “The Force of Destiny,” a title taken from the opening Overture to La Forza del destino by Verdi, but the idea of “destiny” goes much farther than that. “I believe that in this program there’s a thread of destiny,” Elliot Moore, the LSO’s conductor, says.

LSO Music Director Elliot Moore_preview

Elliot Moore

In fact, Moore finds a sense of destiny everywhere he looks: in the pieces he has selected for the program, in the violin that his soloist Andrew Sords will play, in the instruments in the orchestra, in the inclusion of the Longmont Youth Symphony in the performance of one piece on the program, and even in the future of the arts in Longmont.

“In Longmont, we’re living into this possibility of the arts being a real economic driver, and putting the arts on the map here” he says. “It’s something that’s going on. So I find that the music, our soloist, all of these things are all coming together—I believe it’s our destiny.”

After Verdi’s Overture, the next piece on the program will be John Corigliano’s The Red Violin: Chaconne, based on music from the 1998 film The Red Violin, about the twisted fate—or destiny?—of a fictional violin that is traced from 17th-century Italy to England and China, an auction in Montreal and eventually New York. In the film, music by Corigliano was played by violinist Josh Bell. Corigliano later adapted the music to make several concert pieces, including The Red Violin Concerto and The Red Violin: Chaconne.

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Andrew Sords

Sords, who will play the Chaconne with the LSO, says that Corigliano’s score for the film is “one of the genius pieces of the last 23 years. It’s cinematic even without a movie to go with it.”

Sords’ own violin does not quite have the romance and mystique of the fictional “Red Violin,” but it inspires Sords to think about its history. “I think about my own violin, which is only 100 years old: who played on it before me, where did it go? The movie [has] those Hollywood elements, but it really does make you think about these instruments, who played on them, what blood, sweat and tears went into them.”

“That was one of the things that I wanted to do with this program,” Moore says. “Each one of the instruments [in the LSO] has a story. It has some kind of destiny. If it’s to inspire our community or to make its way into the hands of a child, it can change their life. I want to underscore how instruments have life, and they can impact the world.”

Sords will also play La Campanella (The little bell), a movement from Paganini’s Violin Concerto No. 2. Paganini was the greatest violin virtuoso of his time. A great showman, he was known for playing things that others considered impossible. As a result, he was rumored to be in league with the devil—which is the connection that Moore sees to the idea of destiny.

Paganini charicature

Charicature of Paganini

“Paganini was thought of as this devilish character who could do insane feats on the violin,” he says. “To me, that’s how it goes together with The Red Violin, as well as with the rest of the program—this sort of unbelievable ability to do the impossible.”

La Campanella is the last movement of the concerto, written to end the piece with a flourish of virtuoso pyrotechnics. The piece proved to be so catchy that another great virtuoso, Franz Liszt, wrote a brilliant etude based on Paganini’s theme. “If he were alive today, Paganini would probably be writing for Lady Gaga,” Sords says.

But is the movement that difficult for today’s violinists? “I think everything’s difficult,” Sords says. “Intellectually it’s not as hard as others, but you still have to have that little bit of thought and pizzazz and architecture to it in order to pull it off.”

The final work on the concert will be The Pines of Rome by Respighi, one of the great orchestral showpieces, from the eerie depiction of catacombs to the inexorable advance of Roman legions in the finale, “The Pines of the Appian Way.” In addition to the offstage brass that give an extra impact to the finale, The Pines of Rome is also notable as the first piece to combine live performance with an electronic effect: a recording of a nightingale in the peaceful “Pines of the Janiculum.”

LYS.2019

Longmont Youth Symphony (May, 2019)

For this performance, members of the LSO will sit side-by-side with the Longmont Youth Symphony. “Tying us back into the theme of destiny, I think about what this experience may give these young people who are so passionate about music,” Moore says, “where this may lead them down the road—whether they be the future musicians of the Longmont Symphony or any symphony across the United States.

“Including youth in this program is so important to what the Longmont Symphony’s committed to: fostering a love of music for every single person in our community.”

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“The Force of Destiny”

Elliot Moore with the Longmont Symphony_preview
Longmont Symphony, Elliot Moore, conductor
With Andrew Sords, violin
The Longmont Youth Symphony

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb, 15, Vance Brand Civic Auditorium

Verdi: Overture to La forza del destino (The force of destiny)
John Corigliano: The Red Violin: Chaconne for violin and orchestra
Paganini: La Campanella (The little bell) from Violin Concerto No. 2
Respighi: The Pines of Rome (side-by-side with the Longmont Youth Symphony)

Tickets

 

Cellist Adrian Daurov joins Longmont Symphony for Shostakovich Concerto

LSO extends its Beethoven symphony cycle with “Eroica” Nov. 9

By Peter Alexander Nov. 4 at 4:50 p.m.

The Longmont Symphony’s current cycle of Beethoven symphonies enters a new phase next Saturday (Nov. 9), when the full orchestra performs the popular Third Symphony, known as the “Eroica,” in Vance Brand Civic Auditorium.

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LSO and Eliot Moore in Vance Brand Civic Auditorium

The first and second symphonies were performed by the LSO’s smaller chamber orchestra in Stewart Auditorium of the Longmont Museum. The Third, however, was a breakthrough work for Beethoven and the history of the symphony. It is larger in every way than any previous symphony—longer, more intense—and as such needs a larger venue and larger performing forces.

It will be performed Saturday on a program with Shostakovich’s daunting First Cello Concerto, played by Russian-born cellist Anton Daurov. Opening the concert will be the very rarely heard Prelude in Unison from Georges Enesco’s Suite No. 1 for orchestra.

LSO Music Director Elliot Moore_preview

Elliot Moore

The Enesco score is, as the title says, entirely for strings in unison, with occasional punctuation from a timpani. “The Prelude in Unison is a piece that called out to me because there’s something about everyone playing in unison,” LSO conductor Elliot Moore says.

“There’s something that’s very moving about all of those string voices being one, while they’re all singing the same thing. How their voices come together is very beautiful, very moving. It’s a beautiful thing to experience.”

The Cello Concerto occupies a special place for both Moore and Daurov. Moore is a cellist as well as conductor, and both he and Daurov grew up listening to recordings of the concerto by the Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich, for whom it was written.

“It’s one of the pieces that made me really fall in love with classical music,” Moore says. “It’s just an incredible masterpiece for the cello.”

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Adrian Daurov

Daurov confirmed the concerto’s reputation as one of the most difficult pieces in the cello repertoire. “It’s emotionally as well as musically hard,” he says. “There’s a lot of work for the brain as well as the fingers.

“From the first there is not a moment to relax. Even in the slow movement it’s not like your nice and Romantic slow movement than you can just enjoy playing. You really need to build the tension throughout. It’s challenging.”

Unlike most concertos, Shostakovich’s Concerto No.. 1 has a lengthy, fully written out cadenza that leaves the soloist completely exposed. “Not many concertos have a in-written cadenza for 10 minutes in the middle of the piece,” he says.

“You sit in front of people in front of you in the hall, and 100 people behind you in the orchestra, and you have to play this really musically and emotionally challenging cadenza when you are already tired from the first two movements.”

Daurov does feel a special connection to the concerto having grown up in Russia. Like Shostakovich, he attended the St. Petersburg Conservatory. “He went up the same steps and studied in the same classrooms that I did,” he said. “The atmosphere was there and I captured the spirit of the epoch that he was in.”

Because of that connection—and how well he plays the concerto—it is a piece that Daurov is often asked to perform. “I’ve played it with many, many different orchestras,” he says. “I love playing it, I never get tired of it.”

For Moore, Beethoven’s Third Symphony represents a major turning point for the symphony in general. “The ‘Eroica,’ is so much larger than the first or second symphony, or any symphony really that came before it,” he says. “It is the work that ushered in the romantic period. It’s where he breaks new ground.

“It’s big, and I’m really thrilled with what all the musicians are bringing to this performance. I think that the orchestra is bringing a lot of heart and soul and vigor to making this performance something that really is heroic work”

“I think it’s going to be really exciting how we bring these notes off the page!”

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Longmont Symphony Orchestra, Elliot Moore, conductor
With Adrian Daurov, cello

Georges Enesco: Prelude in Unison
Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1
Beethoven: Symphony No 3 (“Eroica”)

7:30 pm. Saturday, Nov. 9, Vance Brand Civic Auditorium, Longmont

Tickets

Mozart is paired with Stravinsky in Longmont Symphony’s Museum concerts

LSO conductor Elliot Moore finds common threads in contrasting music

By Peter Alexander Oct. 17 at 1:20 p.m.

Some of the most interesting classical music programs include apparently contrasting pieces, and then find the common links between them.

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Elliot Moore, conductor of the Longmont Symphony

For example, the next concert by the Longmont Symphony Orchestra, titled La commedia dell’arte (Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 19 and 20, in the Longmont Museum’s Stewart Auditorium), juxtaposes works by Mozart and Stravinsky, two composers of different eras and different aesthetics that we do not usually think of together. But LSO conductor Elliot Moore finds connections between the two.

The works are the Overture and three well-loved arias from Le nozze di Figaro (The marriage of Figaro) by Mozart; a little known concert aria by Mozart; and the full score of Stravinsky’s ballet Pulcinella. Moore will be joined by soprano Christie Conover, tenor Joseph Gaines, and bass Joshua South. The performance is part of the LSO’s chamber orchestra series at the Longmont Museum.

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Outdoor commedia dell’arte performance

“I was very intentional about pairing Mozart with Stravinsky, and in particular this Stravinsky,” Moore says. But exactly how they fit together takes a little explaining, starting with the title of the program. Commedia dell’arte is a form of improvised comedy that originated in Italy in the 16th century and spread across Europe.

“It’s sort of the Saturday Night Live of the time,” Moore says. Taken from village to village and city to city by travelling troupes, it was often performed outdoors. Commedia performances relied upon stock characters, including scheming servants, foolish old men, naive lovers and know-it-all doctors.

The connection to Mozart is that his comic operas, including The Marriage of Figaro, were part of a tradition of Italian comic opera that went back to the commedia dell’arte. Figaro himself, for example, is a direct descendent of the commedia’s scheming servants.

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Pulcinella costume design by Pablo Picasso

Stravinsky’s score, based on music by the 18th-century composer Giovanni Battista Pergolesi and others, was written for a ballet to be produced by the great Russian impresario Sergei Diaghilev. The ballet was a modern gloss on the commedia characters and situations, and takes its title from one of those characters, Pulcinella.

But Moore had other connections in mind, too. “The pairing has an Italian thread, obviously, but also it has this older, Baroque music thread,” he said. The Baroque connection is clear with Stravinsky, whose source was Baroque music. In the case of Mozart, the genre of opera, and many of the musical traditions of 18th-century comic opera—structure, character types, styles of arias, plot design—were developed in the Baroque period from the commedia tradition.

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Soprano Christie Conover

In Moore’s words, “Mozart took these Baroque ideas and concepts, through his music for the stage, and Stravinsky was inspired by Baroque music. These things in many ways are cyclical. They make comebacks.”

On the concert, Mozart’s arias will be sung by Conover. The three arias from Marriage of Figaro are among the musical highlights of the opera: Porgi amor (Grant, love, some comfort) and Dove sono (Where are the lovely moments), both sung by the Countess, and Susanna’s aria Deh vieni, non tadar (Oh come, don’t delay).

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Mozart

In Mozart’s day, operatic roles and their arias were written to suit the individual singers in the original cast. When another singer took a role in a later production, they often asked for a composer—and not necessarily the original composer—to write a new aria that suited them better.

Mozart wrote many such arias, including Voi Avete un cor fedel (You have a faithful heart). A brilliant aria for coloratura soprano, it was most likely written to be substituted in the opera Le nozze di Dorinda (Dorinda’s marriage) by Baldassari Galuppi.

Stravinsky composed Pulcinella in the years after World War I. In 1919 Diaghilev, for whom Stravinsky had written the modernist scores for The Firebird, Petrushka and The Rite of Spring, approached the composer with a totally different idea: orchestrating the music of Pergolesi for a new ballet based on commedia dell’arte characters. At first Stravinsky rejected the idea, but eventually agreed to take a look at the music.

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Stravinsky ca. 1920. By Pierre Choumoff.

“I looked and I fell in love,” he wrote later. His approach to the music—much of it actually not by Pergolesi, as it turned out—was completely new and helped create the style known today as neoclassicism.

“I began by composing on the Pergolesi manuscripts themselves, as though I were correcting an old work of my own,” Stravinsky wrote. “I knew that I could not produce a ‘forgery’ of Pergolesi; at best, I could repeat him in my own accent. . . . The remarkable thing is not how much but how little has been added or changed.”

Stravinsky kept the melodies and the bass lines of the Baroque-era originals, but rewrote the inner parts and then orchestrated the music in his own style. The result is a hybrid that keeps the charm of the original melodies, but adds a tartness that is pure Stravinsky. When the composer was criticized for not respecting the classics, he replied, “you respect, but I love.”

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Scenic design for Pulcinella by Pablo Picasso

The completed score, which calls for a small orchestra and three singers, was premiered in 1920 with choreography by the celebrated Russian dancer Léonide Massine, and with scenery and costumes by Picasso. The production was a popular and critical success, but today the ballet has faded from memory and only the music is still remembered.

“This is the first time I’ve brought Stravinsky to our stage,” Moore says. “I think Pulcinella is a wonderful choice for our audience to get to know Stravinsky. And what I think is so cool about this piece is that Picasso did the costumes.

“I just love that combination, Stravinsky and Picasso; it brings that period to life, for me.”

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Longmont Symphony in Stewart Auditorium

La commedia dell’arte
Longmont Symphony, Elliot Moore, conductor
With Christie Conover, soprano; Joseph Gaines, tenor; and Joshua South, bass

Mozart: Overture to Le Nozze di Figaro (The marriage of Figaro)
Mozart: Three arias from Le Nozze di Figaro: Porgi amor,” “Dove sono,” and “Deh vieni”
Mozart: Concert aria, Voi Avete un cor fedel
Stravinsky: Pulcinella (complete ballet music)

7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19
4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20
Stewart Auditorium, Longmont Museum

Tickets

Longmont Symphony opens new season, “Music is Life,” with music for organ

Program also inspired by the tragic burning of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris

By Peter Alexander Oct. 3 at 2 p.m.

The Longmont Symphony Orchestra will open their 2019–20 season, “Music is Life,” at 7:30 p.m. Saturday (Oct. 5) in Vance Brand Auditorium, with three pieces that celebrate the wealth and variety of music for organ.

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Elliot Moore with the Longmont Symphony

The program comprises Leopold Stokowski’s orchestral arrangement of J.S. Bach’s Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor; Francis Poulenc’s Concerto for organ, strings and timpani; and Camille Saint-Saëns’ Symphony No. 3, known as the “Organ Symphony” for the prominent part for that instrument within the orchestra. The guest organist is Brian du Fresne.

But if you have been in Vance Brand Auditorium, you know that there is no grand pipe organ, or any other kind of organ in the hall. Nonetheless, LSO conductor Elliot Moore says that is not a problem. He has known from the time he arrived in Longmont that digital organs that can be transported, installed and played for a single performance are available locally.

Finding an organ to use with the LSO “was in my mind as a possibility,” he says. “I thought that it was an exciting possibility, one that I wanted to do at some point.” For Saturday’s concert, the LSO has rented a Viscount three-manual, 51-stop digital organ provided by Church Organ Works of Loveland.

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Saint-Saëns playing the organ

The program fit into this year in part because of the season theme, or “thread” as Moore calls it, “Music is Life.” “I knew that I wanted to open the season, not just with something that’s big and bombastic, something that is going to set the tone for our season, but something that is uplifting, and tells some kind of narrative about life,” he says.

“There is something about Saint-Saëns’ ‘Organ Symphony’ that I find to be very organic, and while it is certainly not program music, it does take us through a process that winds up in triumph. It is one of my favorite pieces, because it seems to have everything. It has incredible lyricism, it has sorrow, it has angst, it has passion, and all of these things are elements that are in life.”

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Francis Poulenc

Once he had an organ for the concert, Moore says, he thought of performing another piece that would not be possible without an organ. One of the pieces he thought of is the Organ Concerto by Poulenc, a much more delicate and light-hearted work that Saint-Saëns’ dramatic symphony.

“It was my idea [to add the Poulenc Concerto to the program], but I spoke to du Fresne to see if that was a piece that he wanted to bring to our audience, and it was a resounding ‘yes.’ He was very enthusiastic about pairing these two works.”

Both works are by French composers, which is one reason they are not heard as often in this country as are the more standard classical works from Austria and Germany. Moore believes both works will receive their first Longmont performance on Saturday.

Opening the concert will be conductor Leopold Stokowski’s orchestral arrangement of Bach’s Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. Its place on the program comes from a tragedy that occurred while Moore as thinking about the program: the burning of Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris.

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Conductor Elliot Moore was inspired by the Parisian crowds singing as Notre Dame burned

“I went home one day and saw Notre Dame on CNN, burning,” Moore says. “It was an emotional experience for me in the sense that I lived in Paris for 6 months and had been inside of Notre Dame several times. And then they were showing pictures of Parisians singing together.

“All these people were coming together, to mourn, to present a united voice for culture, to console one another—all of these things. The image of the church burning and of people coming together was a very moving juxtaposition. That was where I had the idea to program the Bach/Stokowski Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, because that work is the equivalent of Gothic architecture—how it’s structured and how it builds to soaring lines and how it represents something more than itself.

“That was very moving to me.”

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Longmont Symphony Orchestra,, Elliot Moore, conductor
With Brian du Fresne, organ
“Opening Night: The Organ Symphony”

J.S. Bach/Stokowski: Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor
Poulenc: Concerto for organ, strings and timpani
Saint-Saëns: Symphony No. 3 (“Organ Symphony”)

7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5
Vance Brand Civic Auditorium

Tickets

 

Longmont Symphony announces 2019–2020 season, “Music is Life”

Handel’s Messiah and ongoing Beethoven cycle will be among season’s highlights

By Peter Alexander May 15 at 2:15 p.m.

The 53rdseason of the Longmont Symphony will include a performance of Handel’s Messiah, two programs in the orchestra’s ongoing Beethoven cycle, and two performances each of two chamber orchestra programs in the Longmont Museum’s Stewart Auditorium.

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Elliot More with there Longmont Symphony. Smiling Elk Photography.

Under the title “Music is Life,” the 2019–20 season is the third under music director Elliot Moore. There will be six concerts in the LSO’s home, Vance Brand Auditorium, including a Pops concert, “LSO at the Movies!” (May 9, 2020), and a family concert (Jan. 18, 2020; see full schedule below).

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Elliot Moore

During Moore’s first two years with the LSO, the Beethoven cycle included performances of the First and Second symphonies by a chamber orchestra in Stewart Auditorium. For 2019–20, the cycle moves into Vance Brand Auditorium for a performance of the Third Symphony by the full LSO (Nov. 9), followed by the Fourth Symphony performed by the Longmont Chamber Orchestra back in Stewart Auditorium (March 7 & 8).

A longstanding tradition of the LSO, performances of Tchaikovsky’s Nutcracker with Boulder Ballet, will continue on Dec. 7 & 8. The “Gentle Nutcracker,” a sensory-friendly performance of the beloved ballet designed for individuals with special needs and their families, will be presented Dec. 7.

The Main Series opening night, Oct. 5, will feature organist Brian du Fresne playing Francis Poulenc’s Concerto for Organ and the organ part of Camille Saint-Saëns’ Symphony No. 3 “avec orgue” (with organ), popularly known as the “Organ Symphony.” Other soloists during the season will include Russian cellist Adrian Daurov, playing Shostakovich’s Cello Concerto No. 1 (Nov. 9); the return to Longmont of violinist Andrew Sords for John Corigliano’s Violin Concerto “The Red Violin” (Feb. 15); and percussionist Cameron Leach performing Jennifer Higdon’s Percussion Concerto (April 4).

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Christie Conover

The Messiah performance (Dec. 15) will feature the Longmont Chorale Singers and vocal soloists TBA. Soprano Christie Conover and bass Joshua South will perform Stravinsky’s complete Pulcinella ballet with the Chamber Orchestra in Stewart Auditorium (Oct. 19­–20), on a program that will also include Conover singing Mozart arias with the orchestra.

Kicking off the entire season is the LSO’s annual free concert July 4 in Thompson Park. As in past years, the program will be shared with the Longmont Chorale and the Longmont Youth Symphony.

Six‐concert subscription packages for the LSO’s 53rdseason go on sale on Monday, May 20 (call 303‐772‐5796;10 a.m.–2 p.m. Mondays; and 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays). Series subscribers receive up to 20% off single ticket prices. Single tickets for Main Series concerts are $25 for adults, $22 for seniors and active military, $5 for children/students ($10 for the Pops and Messiah performances).

All LSO Museum concerts are $35 (includes a glass of wine and post‐concert reception). Handel’s Messiah tickets are $30 for adults; children/students $10. Family Concert tickets are $10. Single tickets go on sale on Monday, Aug. 26, via phone and online here.

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JULY 4TH CONCERT IN THE PARK

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LSO in Thompson Park. Photo by Peter Alexander.

Thursday, July 4, 11:30 a.m.
Thompson Park, 420 Bross Street, Longmont (Free and open to the public)
11:30 a.m. – Longmont Youth Symphony
12:30 p.m. – Longmont Chorale
1 p.m. – Longmont Symphony, Elliot Moore, conductor

MAIN SERIES CONCERTS
All Main Series Concerts are conducted by Elliot Moore and performed at Vance Brand Civic Auditorium at Skyline High School. 

Opening Night: The Organ Symphony
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 5
With Brian du Fresne, organ

J.S. Bach, arr. Stokowski: Passacaglia and Fugue
Francis Poulenc: Concerto for Organ
Saint‐Saëns: Symphony No. 3, “Organ Symphony” 

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Adrian Daurov

Beethoven Cycle
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 9
With Adrian Daurov, cello

George Enescu: Prelude in Unison
Shostakovich: Cello Concerto No. 1
Beethoven: Symphony No. 3, “Eroica”

The Force of Destiny
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 15
With Andrew Sords, violin

Verdi: Overture to La forza del destino
John Corigliano: The Red Violin Violin Concerto
Paganini: Violin Concerto No. 2, Rondo (“La Campanella”)
Respighi: The Pines of Rome

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Cameron Leach

A Fanfare for All: Sidebyside with the Longmont Youth Symphony
7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 4
With Cameron Leach, percussion

Gwyneth Walker: Open the Door
Jennifer Higdon: Percussion Concerto
Copland: Symphony No. 3

Pops Concert: LSO at the Movies!
7:30 p.m. Saturday, May 9

Music from Chariots of Fire, Cinema Paradiso, Batman, Titanic, Lord of the Rings, and other films

MUSEUM CONCERTS
Stewart Auditorium, Longmont Museum

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La Commedia dell’arte
Longmont Chamber Orchestra
Elliot Moore, conductor, with Christie Conover, soprano; tenor TBA; and Joshua South, bass

7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 19
4 p.m. Sunday, Oct. 20

Mozart: Overture to Le nozze di Figaro
Mozart: Selected arias for soprano and orchestra
Stravinsky: Pulcinella (complete ballet)

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Beethoven. Portrait by Christian Horneman, 1803

Beethoven Cycle: Schubert & Beethoven
Longmont Chamber Orchestra, Elliot Moore, conductor

7 p.m. Saturday, March 7
4 p.m. Sunday, March 8

Schubert: Symphony No. 5
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4

 

HOLIDAY EVENTS

 The Nutcracker with the Boulder Ballet
Music by Tchaikovsky
Elliot Moore, conductor

4 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7,
2 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 8
Vance Brand Civic Auditorium 

The Gentle Nutcracker
1 p.m. Saturday, Dec. 7, 1 p.m.
Vance Brand Civic Auditorium

A sensory‐friendly performance for individuals with special needs and their families.

 

Handel’s Messiah
Longmont Chamber Orchestra and Longmont Chorale Singers
Elliot Moore, conductor, with vocal soloists TBA

4 p.m. Sunday, Dec. 15
Westview Presbyterian Church, Longmont

FAMILY CONCERT

 

Longmont Symphony Orchestra, Elliot Moore, conductor
4 p.m. Saturday, Jan. 18
Vance Brand Civic Auditorium

Saint‐Saëns: Selections from Carnival of the Animals
Bizet: Les Toreadores from Carmen
Prokofiev: Peter and the Wolf 

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Subscription tickets for the LSO go on sale Monday, may 20. Call 303-772-5796. Single tickets will go on sale Monday, Aug. 26.