Boulder Piano Quartet: free concerts at The Academy, March 9 and May 4

First-rate performances of interesting repertoire

By Peter Alexander March 4 at 11:30 p.m.

The Boulder Piano Quartet is hidden in plain sight.

BPQ

Boulder Piano Quartet

The group is made up of four well known, highly visible professionals from the front range area: violinist Charles Wetherbee and pianist David Korevaar from the CU College of Music, with violist Matthew Dane and cellist Thomas Heinrich. They present first-rate performances of interesting repertoire not often found on other concerts, and their concerts are free, making them the best chamber music deal you’ll find.

And yet they don’t have a very high profile, possibly because they don’t perform in the usual concert venues. Instead, they play at the Academy, a former girls’ school turned retirement community, which underwrites the concerts as enrichment for their residents. Performances are held in a former chapel, a large room with excellent acoustics, and are open to the public. Parking is easy to find in the neighborhood. Refreshments such as desserts or wine and cheese are provided at each performance.

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The Academy in Boulder

In other words, there is no downside.

For the current season the BPQ has prepared four programs of which two remain, at 7 p.m. Fridays March 9 and May 4. The performance Friday of this week features music by Joaquin Turina, Pierre Jalbert and Dvořák. In May the program will comprise two large-scale late Romantic works by Zdenek Fibich and Richard Strauss.

Formed in the early 2000s, the quartet originally performed under the auspices of the Boulder Public Library. “We performed fairly regularly for a number of years, but around eight or nine years ago the library’s relationship with the performing arts was changing and things slowed down (for the quartet),” pianist David Korevaar explains.

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Ruth Shanberge

More recently Ruth Shanberge, a patron of the arts and an Academy resident who passed away in 2017, arranged for Korevaar and violinist Charles Wetherbee to present chamber music at the Academy. That became the impetus to re-start the quartet.

“Ruth was all about music and its role in culture,” Korevaar says. “Bringing music to the Academy was an important mission for her. That’s why we are now in our third season of presenting concerts (there). This has been a wonderful arrangement for us, because the Academy has been very welcoming and supportive of what we do.”

The repertoire for piano quartet (violin, viola, cello and piano) is less well known than that for piano trio (violin, cello and piano). “It’s nothing like as rich as the trio repertoire,” Korevaar says, “but the quartet repertoire is extremely good. One of the things we’ve been trying to do is get outside of what would be standard for the piano quartet.”

The central works for piano quartet are two quartets by Mozart, plus three works by Brahms, one by Schumann and two by Dvořák. But as you move into the 20th century there are many more works to chose from, some of which are on the upcoming concerts.

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Composer Pierre Jalbert

Of the works on Friday’s concert, Turina’s Piano Quartet was written in 1932, and Jalbert’s Secret Alchemy was premiered in 2012. The former is “a wonderful typical Turina piece, filled with Spanish bullfighter music,” Korevaar says. “It’s a wonderful piece. It’s not complex, it’s very attractive, and it’s beautifully put together and beautifully written for the ensemble. It’s quite fresh and it’s beautiful music.”

Jalbert currently teaches composition at Rice University and is known for his creative use of musical colors. The atmospheric movements of Secret Alchemy have suggestive titles, including “Mystical,” “Timeless, mysterious, reverberant” and “With great energy.”

The third piece on the program Friday is Dvořák’s First Piano Quartet. Even though it is one of the standard pieces for piano quartet, it is rarely performed. “A very beautiful piece, it does have some structural oddities,” Korevaar says. “The last movement is quite eccentric, but the music is beautiful, and it’s texturally very inventive. He does remarkable things in terms of each instrument and how he puts them together.”

The BPQ’s final concert of the spring will feature two works form the end of the 19th century, the Piano Quartet in E minor by Fibich and the Piano Quartet in C minor, an early work by Strauss. “That’s a very friendly program,” Korevaar says. ”It’s all this very central European kind of music. The gemütlickeit (warmth, or geniality) is very real, in the case of both of those pieces. So I think it’s an easy listening program.”

Of the two, the Strauss is the more difficult for the players. “Strauss likes to write to the extremes of all the instruments,” Korevaar says “As in his orchestral music, he’s interested in virtuosity. Everybody’s got a lot to do, and that makes it difficult to put together. But the music is wonderful.”

Although the Academy is a non-traditional location for concerts, Korevaar likes to play there. “It’s a slightly unconventional concert space, this former chapel in what was a girls’ school,” he says. “But it’s a wonderful space for chamber music. It’s a perfect large salon with a very high ceiling. The acoustics are very warm, and the strings sound great in that room.

“It’s a rewarding place to play, and there’s always a great ambience there.”

# # # # #

Boulder Piano Quartet
Charles Wetherbee, violin
Matthew Dane, viola
Thomas Heinrich, cello
David Korevaar, piano

7 p.m. Friday, March 9
Chapel Hall, The Academy, 970 Aurora Ave. (entrance off 10th St.), Boulder
Joaquin Turina: Piano Quartet
Pierre Jalbert: Secret Alchemy
Antonin Dvořák: Piano Quartet No. 1 in D major
Admission is free, but audience members are asked to RSVP at 303-938-1920.

7 p.m. Friday, May 4
Chapel Hall, The Academy, 970 Aurora Ave. (entrance off 10th St.), Boulder
Zdenek Fibich: Piano Quartet in E minor
Richard Strauss: Piano Quartet in C minor
Admission is free, but audience members are asked to RSVP at 303-938-1920.

 

 

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Composer Lowell Liebermann will have residency at CU Boulder College of Music

Public performances Oct. 18 & 19 provide an introduction to his music

By Peter Alexander

If you don’t know the music of American composer Lowell Liebermann, the coming week is your opportunity.

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Composer Lowell Lieberman. Photo by Christian Steiner

Actually, if you do know his music, the coming week is an opportunity, too. The composer of accessible, intriguing, and often surprising works in many different genres, Liebermann will be in residence at the CU College of Music through Thursday (Oct. 19). The residency includes two full programs of Liebermann’s music—at noon Wednesday at the Dairy Arts Center and at 7:30 p.m. Thursday in Grusin Concert Hall. (See the schedule below for details and admission information.)

A Roser Visiting Artist at CU, Liebermann was invited by Peter and Helen Weil Prof. of Piano David Korevaar, who met Liebermann when they were both undergraduates at Juilliard. “We’ve known each other since we were, dare I say, still teenagers!” Korevaar says. “And I’ve been interested in his music ever since.”

Korevaar has been playing some of Liebermann’s pieces in concerts over the past year, and just completed a recording of his music. “I was thinking very much about Lowell,” he says, “so I thought it would be great to have him come. [CU composition professor] Dan Kellogg was very supportive and together we applied for funding from the Roser Visiting Artist’s Fund.”

As part of the Roser fund’s support, Liebermann will be meeting with many different groups of CU students this week. Activities include masterclasses with piano and flute students, coachings with all the performers of his works being presented during the residency, and extensive work with composition students.

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David Korevaar

For those who may not know Liebermann’s music, Korevaar explains that it’s “accessible in the best sense. Often very lyrical, often dramatic. There’s a lot of variety— what he’s got first of all is an amazing craft. He can write anything, and for anything. He also has a great imagination, but he manages to integrate everything so well.

“His music, especially what he wrote in the 1990s, tended to have a lot of very, shall we say, nominally pleasant and familiar sounds. And some of it is not pleasant—one of the things that Lowell can do is really create some nightmarish sounds. He’ll do that by twisting your expectations, but he balances it well. He knows how to balance things, as any good composer does.”

Korevaar, who has been very busy with performances lately, from Beethoven with the Boulder Philharmonic to several Faculty Tuesday recitals and a Brahms concerto on tour, will be part of several of the performances. In spite of everything on his plate, he likes Liebermann’s music so much that he was unable to resist joining in.

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Jennifer Hayghe

“My original plan when I put this whole thing together was I wasn’t going to do any of the playing,” he says. “But how can I not put myself in? Lowell has some recent chamber pieces that he was particularly interested having done, plus there was the Sonata for Two Pianos, and I thought that would be a great piece for me to finally get to play with Jennifer Hayghe.”

The performances during the coming week will feature Korevaar and other CU faculty, students and alumni. Several of the piano pieces are included, played by different artists, including Liebermann himself Wednesday at the Dairy.

A number of chamber pieces are also included in the two concerts, among them the Flute Sonata—probably Liebermann’s best known work—performed by flutist Joshua Hall and pianist Cecilia Kao, and the Sonata for Two Pianos by Korevaar and Hayghe.

Another that Korevaar thinks is especially impressive to hear is the Trio for clarinet, viola and piano, which he will play with clarinetist Daniel Silver and violist Ericka Eckert. (The full program for both concerts is listed below.) There will also be a talk-back with the composer following the Wednesday performance at the Dairy.

If you need one more reason to attend the concerts, Korevaar points out that there will plenty of flash and dazzle on display, including the Trio for clarinet, viola and piano. “I think one of the reasons that Lowell’s music has been very successful is that he also understands instrumental virtuosity, and there’s plenty of that,” he says.

“His music can be very brilliant and very showy.”

# # # # #

Lowell Liebermann Residency
CU Boulder College of Music

Public events:

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Liebermann

2 p.m. Monday, Oct. 16, Grusin Concert Hall
Piano class, with CU students playing works by Lowell Liebermann

3:30 pm. Tuesday, Oct. 17, Room NB59, Imig Music Building
Flute Class, Christian Jennings Studio

12 noon Wednesday, Oct. 18, Dairy Arts Center
Soundscape at the Dairy: Music of Lowell Liebermann

—Piano Quartet: Sharon Park, violin; Stephanie Mientka, viola; Zachary Reaves, cello; Sarah Rushing, piano
—Elegy for Clarinet and Piano: Emily Wrangler, clarinet; Adam Coleman, piano
—Nocturne No. 2: Ryan Grippo, piano
—Nocturne No. 7: Sophia Zervas, piano
—Nocturne No. 10: Lowell Liebermann, piano
—Trio for clarinet, viola and piano: Daniel Silver, clarinet; Ericka Eckert, viola; David Korevaar, piano
—Post-concert talkback with Lowell Liebermann, David Korevaar, and Sharon Park

Tickets

7:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 19, Grusin Concert Hall
Faculty/student recital of music by Lowell Liebermann

—Flute Sonata: Joshua Hall, flute, and Cecilia Kao, piano
—Nocturne No. 8: Maria Wietrzynska, piano
—Piano Trio No. 3: Charles Wetherbee, violin; David Requiro, cello; David Korevaar, piano
—Violin Sonata: William Terwilliger, violin, and Andrew Cooperstock, piano
—Sonata for Two Pianos: Jennifer Hayghe and David Korevaar
—Daydream and Nightmare for two pianos, eight hands: Sarah Rushing, Jonathan Morris, Nathália Kato, and Barbara Noyes

Free and open to the public.
_______________

Edited 10.16 to correct the names of performers due to last-minute schedule changes.

Boulder Philharmonic brings “Music of Resistance” to Macky

Pieces by Benjamin Britten, Beethoven and Shostakovich

By Peter Alexander

The Boulder Philharmonic calls their next concert “Music of Resistance,” but it might more accurately be called “Music of Conscience.”

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Boulder Philharmonic

The concert, at 7:30 p.m. Saturday (Oct. 14) in Macky Auditorium, features three pieces, each of which expresses a message of conscience from the composer—two of them explicit, one more murky and controversial. Music director Michael Butterman will conduct.

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Tenor Matthew Plenk

The first piece will be Benjamin Britten’s Ballad of Heroes for tenor, chorus and orchestra, composed in 1939 for a “Festival of Music for the People” held in London. A setting of poetry by W.H. Auden and Randall Swingler, it is a response to the Spanish Civil War. The overtly political text roundly condemns the “numberless Englishmen” who have forgotten those who “fight for peace, for liberty, for you.” Matthew Plenk, a faculty member at the University of Denver’s Lamont School of Music, will be the tenor soloist.

The second is Beethoven’s Fantasy for Piano, Vocal Soloists, Chorus and Orchestra, composed in 1808 for a massive concert that included the Fifth and Sixth Symphonies, the Fourth Piano Concerto, two movements from the Mass in C major. The Fantasy was hurriedly composed as a concert-ending piece that would bring all of the performers together.

The text, suggested by Beethoven and written mostly by the poet Christoph Kuffner, expresses the composer’s idealistic conviction that music can bestow “outer peace and inner bliss,” and the blessings of the gods upon mankind. CU music professor David Korevaar will be the soloist.

The final and more controversial piece is Shostakovich’s Symphony No. 5, composed in 1937. The score was written after the composer was sharply criticized and threatened under orders from Stalin. Shostakovich stated that the subsequent symphony was “a Soviet artist’s creative response to justified criticism,” and it ends with a march that expresses either the triumph of the Soviet state, or its brutality, depending on the interpretation.

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Michael Butterman

“There are different views of this,” Butterman says. “Certainly one of the more prevalent is the notion that Shostakovich was more or less pinned against the wall and told, ‘it would be a shame if anything happened to your career.’ So the question is, did he just say, ‘You want something that’s life-affirming? I can do that.’ Or was it a veiled protest?

“There is a way that rings in the Shostakovich that could be interpreted as compelled, or rejoicing that is done for show. Of course I don’t know, but I tend to think it’s that.”

The other two works are unfamiliar, but both can be seen as early, small-scale versions of larger and more familiar works written later in the composer’s career. Britten’s Ballad of Heroes shares many traits with the composer’s War Requiem, written in 1962, including the textual contrast between the quiet British homefront and the horror of war, brass fanfares, and Britten’s characteristic style of vocal writing for the soloist.

Similarly, Beethoven’s Fantasy sounds very much like the Ninth Symphony written 16 years later. The regular phrasing and simple outline of the theme, the combination of chorus, soloists and orchestra, and the use of variations leading to a triumphant close inevitably remind listeners of the symphony’s famous finale.

In spite of being unfamiliar, both works are “worth hearing and also interesting because of their better known analogs,” Butterman says. “You get some insight into the world views and the frames of mind of these two (composers), through the text and the quality of the music carrying the text.”

The Britten was suggested to Butterman by an orchestra member. He didn’t know the score, but once he listened, he said, “I thought it was really effective.

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Benjamin Britten

“It’s fascinating because Britten was a pacifist, and yet this piece is celebrating those who went off in the International Brigade to fight in the Spanish civil, against fascism. He’s saying, If you believe in something, you’ve got to stand up for it.”

Plenk had not heard the piece before, either. As in much of Britten’s music, he says, “there’s a somewhat instrumental character to the way he writes for tenor.”

As for the political content of the text, “any time you’re performing, you’re trying to express what the composer intended, whether it’s political or not,” he says. “I’d urge people to let the text lead them (in how they listen to the music). I would say that with any music, but this was written for a specific purpose, to memorialize the fallen soldiers from the International Brigade of the Spanish Civil War.”

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David Korevaar

Korevaar relishes the opportunity to play Beethoven’s Fantasy. “One of the reasons we play it is because it has this wonderful sense of uplift,” he says. “It starts in C minor, a key that Beethoven uses for drama and tragedy. And C major (where it ends) is a key of joy and light. And so there is an aspect of a ritual experience” when you hear it.

One thing Korevaar particularly enjoys is the way “the piano is given a sort of Promethean role,” he says. “When I play this piece I have the feeling of having magical powers.

“The piano begins alone, and then we add the instruments one at a time. It’s like you’re giving life to all these figures, and then once the orchestra and the piano have had their say, what more can you do? Then you conjure up human voices, first solos and then a chorus!

“It’s really marvelous.”

# # # # #

Music of Resistance
Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra, Michael Butterman, conductor
Matthew Plenk, tenor, and David Korevaar, piano
CU Boulder and Western Illinois University choirs
7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 14, Macky Auditorium

Tickets

Mozart, movies and more at the Dairy

2017–18 concert season gets underway at the Dairy Arts Center

By Peter Alexander

Some of Boulder’s best musicians want to see you at the Dairy.

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Pianist David Korenaar

That’s the punning implication of the new series CU@The Dairy, presented jointly by the Dairy Arts Center and University of Colorado College of Music. That concert series opens Thursday, Sept. 7 with “Miraculous Mozart,” a program of Mozart piano concertos with David Korevaar, the Helen and Peter Weil Professor of Piano, doubling as soloist and conductor, and continues eight days later, Friday, Sept. 15, with a screening of the 1918 film The Yellow Ticket with live music performed by klezmer violinist Alicia Svigals and pianist Marilyn Lerner.

“Miraculous Mozart” will feature two of Mozart’s piano concertos, K449 in E-flat major and K450 in B-flat major, with Korevaar leading and playing with a chamber orchestra.

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Alicia Svigals and Marilyn Lerner performing for a screening of ‘The Yellow Ticket’

A silent film from 1918, The Yellow Ticket is of great historical interest for several reasons: It was filmed in the Warsaw Ghetto; it features a teenaged Pola Negri, who went on to great fame as a femme fatale in Hollywood; and it was reconstructed from various partial sources after the Nazis tried to destroy all traces of the film in the 1940s.

Read more in Boulder Weekly.

 

September music events at the Dairy:

CU@The Dairy: Miraculous Mozart
David Korevaar, piano, and chamber orchestra.
7:30 p.m. Sept. 7

The Yellow Ticket
Film screening with live music
Alicia Svigals, violin, and Marilyn Lerner, piano.
8 p.m. Sept. 15 [note corrected time]

Jazz at the Dairy: From Peru to Mexico.
Guitarist Alfredo Muro with former Dairy music curator James Bailey, cello.
7:30 p.m. Sept. 16

Soundscape: Women in Classical Music.
2 p.m. Sept. 20

One Night Only: Shake, Schimmel, and Shout!
7:30 p.m. Sept. 27

Other fall dates and ticket information here.

NOTE: The time of the screening of The Yellow Ticket has been corrected to 8 p.m. An earlier version of the story listed the time as 7:30 p.m.

CU Faculty Tuesdays, free and live-streamed, offer a fascinating potpourri of repertoire

With several performances on the calendar, pianist David Korevaar’s plate is full

By Peter Alexander

The summer has ended and fall has arrived.

It may not seem like it when it reaches 90°, but you can be certain. Not only is it Labor Day Weekend, the official end of summer, but the fall music has season has, in fact, already begun. The first of the CU College of Music Faculty Tuesday concerts was already last week, when pianist David Korevaar and violinist Harumi Rhodes played a program of sonatas for violin and piano by Beethoven, Janáček and Schumann.

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Grusin Hall, home of “Faculty Tuesdays”

That series continues tomorrow, Tuesday, Sept. 5, with a Faculty Tuesday debut by baritone Andrew Garland performing a program titled “The Quest” with pianist Jeremy Reger. Future Faculty Tuesday events, listed here, will feature guests from the Cleveland Orchestra Sept. 12, Korevaar and violist Geraldine Walther performing “Chopin on the Viola” Sept. 26, and a fascinating potpourri of other topics and programs through the fall.

The Faculty Tuesday concerts are all at 7:30 in Grusin Music Hall, and all are free. Even better, you can watch from home and avoid the parking free-for-all around campus: the College of Music will provide live streaming of these events, available through the “CU Presents” button on the Faculty Tuesdays Web page listing of each event.

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Pianist David Korenaar, Helen and Peter Weir Professor of Piano at CU, Boulder

None of the music faculty will be busier this fall than Korevaar, who shows up on four more Faculty Tuesdays in addition to his series-opening recital with Rhodes last week: “Chopin on the Viola” with Walther Sept. 26; “Finnish Celebration” with eight other faculty members Oct. 24; “Schubert and More” with violinist Charles Wetherbee Oct. 31; and “Signs Games+Messages” with Rhodes, Walther and cellist David Requiro Nov. 28.

Not letting any grass grow under his feet or on his keyboard, Korevaar also inaugurates the new CU@The Dairy series at the Dairy Arts Center on Thursday, Sept. 7, playing and conducting two of Mozart’s piano concertos. And as if that weren’t enough, he will be performing Beethoven’s Fantasy for Piano, Chorus and Orchestra, op. 80, with the Boulder Philharmonic at 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 14 in Macky Auditorium (tickets here).

“Yeah, there’s a lot on the plate,” Korevaar admits.

Thursday’s concert at the Diary, titled “Miraculous Mozart,” will feature two of Mozart’s piano concertos, K449 in E-flat major and K450 in B-flat major. They were both written in the same year, 1784, and of the two Korevaar identifies the second as the more difficult. “Mozart wrote a letter to his father,” he says, “and he said [K450] is the hardest thing he’s ever written. I might not disagree—it’s a tough piece, so obviously virtuoso.”

You will be able to read more about Korevaar, the Mozart concertos, and CU@The Dairy on this Web page and in the next issue of Boulder Weekly on Thursday, Sept. 7.

CU music faculty will appear on a new concert series at the Dairy Center

“CU at the Dairy” opens Sept. 7 with “Miraculous Mozart”

By Peter Alexander

Two of Boulder’s eminent arts organizations have joined together to inaugurate a promising new collaborative music series this fall.

The University of Colorado College of Music and the Dairy Arts Center have announced a series of concerts jointly sponsored by both organizations, to be held during the year in the Dairy’s Grace and Gordon Gamm Theater. “CU at the Dairy,” featuring music faculty members in collaboration with one another and other local artists, will supplement the free Faculty Tuesdays series of recitals in Grusin Hall.

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The lobby of the Grace and Gordon Gamm Theater at the Dairy Arts Center

Based on early listings, the Grusin Hall Faculty Tuesday events will be more traditional recitals, while the CU at the Dairy will be more exploratory, collaborative, and in some cases will be multi-media events. In a news release from Aug. 16, the Dairy’s music curator, Sharon Park, says that the CU faculty “have such great ideas and projects they want to present. The Gordon [Gamm Theater] gives them an intimate venue to pair visual art, silent film, dance or any other art form with music.”

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David Korenaar

The series gets underway Sept. 7 with “Miraculous Mozart,” featuring Helen and Peter Weil Professor of Piano David Korevaar playing and conducting Mozart’s piano concertos K449 in E-flat major and K450 in B-flat major. The small orchestra for these performances will include violinist Charles Wetherbee from the music faculty along with other faculty and alumni of the College of Music.

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Alicia Svigals performing “The Yellow Ticket” in Vancouver

The following week a multi-media event will bring together representatives of the College of Music, CU’s Program in Jewish Studies and International Film Series. Yonatan Malin, faculty in the music theory area of the College of Music, will host the screening of “The Yellow Ticket” a silent film from 1918. The film, about a young Jewish woman studying medicine in Tsarist Russia, will be accompanied by Klezmer violinist Alicia Svigals and jazz pianist Marilyn Lerner performing Svigals’s original score live. Malin will also moderate a panel discussion with the performers and CU faculty members about film, music and cultural awareness.

“CU at the Dairy” will continue in the spring with a performance by Thompson Jazz Studies director John Gunther and friends. More details about these performances will appear on this Web page and in the pages of Boulder Weekly.

Tickets for all “CU at the Dairy” performances are available through the Dairy Center Box Office.

 

 

CU College of Music adds Fourth Named Program

$2 million gift endows the Roser Piano and Keyboard Department

By Peter Alexander

The Roser Piano and Keyboard Department joins the Thompson Jazz Studies Program, the Ritter Family Classical Guitar Program and the Eklund Opera Program as one of four named programs at the University of Colorado, Boulder, College of Music.

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Becky Roser. Photo by Patrick Campbell/University of Colorado.

The name is the result of a $2 million endowment created by Becky Roser, who has helped support the College of Music in a number of significant ways. She is currently the chair of the music+ campaign committee, a fundraising effort that aims to raise $50 million for the College of Music in advance of its centennial in 2020.

Roser’s is the first major gift to the music+ campaign since it’s public announcement earlier this year. Roser says the gift reflects her love of the piano from childhood. “My mom and dad bought me a piano back in 1951,” she said in a statement from the university. “I played that piano from the time I was young, and then my daughter Nicole played it, too.”

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Robert Shay

“This is an individual of unique vision and leadership and commitment,” College of Music Dean Robert Shay says. “Becky was determined to make this happen, and it really comes from the heart, it comes from her passion, from her love for music generally, but I think her love for this College of Music in particular.

“I want to highlight from my perspective how much Becky means to all of us here in the college and how appreciative we feel of this very generous effort. These kind of funds really allow all of us, our faculty especially, to kind of dream big.”

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David Korevaar

David Korevaar, the Helen and Peter Weil Faculty Fellow and acting chair of the piano and keyboard department, says it will take some time for the faculty to realize what the gift will mean. “It’s a whole new world as far we’re concerned,” he says. “We’re all still sort of just getting our heads around this. We’re going to end up in a situation where we can be thinking more strategically, and thinking bigger than we’ve been able to think.

“We have this great feeling that Becky, who has been such a friend to the College of Music, is willing to make this amazing investment in keyboard. That’s just kind of a stunning, wonderful thing.”

Korevaar said that the faculty have discussed several opportunities that the funds would create. These include a summer piano festival in Boulder, residencies by distinguished keyboard artists that would include both teaching and performances, and increased support for scholarships and professional development for students. Such plans will develop over time, he says.

The statement from the university quoted Roser saying “It makes me happy and it brings me joy to be able to do this. An endowment goes on forever, and now more than ever, it’s important to have done this.”

Prior to heading the music+ campaign, Roser served on the College of Music Advisory Board, and led a fundraising program to refinish the pianos in the Grusin Music Hall and Chamber Hall.

The contribution to the piano and keyboard department is only the latest in a series of gifts from the Roser family to the CU Boulder campus. The Roser Visiting Artists Program brings artists, musicians, dancers and filmmakers to campus as guests. In 2009, the ATLAS Institute’s home on campus was named the Roser ATLAS Center in honor of a gift by Becky and her late husband Jim Roser.